NEW AUS VIDS: BARKAA, REDDEYE GLIZZI, JALMAR

We’re over halfway in 2021 and have hit Week 27 of our New Hip-Hop Videos From Aus wrap, collating the latest and best visuals to drop from the AU. Don’t miss a video! Subscribe to be first in the know with all the latest clips from across the country. Which video you into this week? Dive in our comments with your fav!

BARKAA – KING BROWN
(Directed by Sonder Films)

Making her mark on 2021, Barkaa fires her cheeky and roaring new single, ‘King Brown’. The Sonder Films-directed music video finds the Malyangapa and Barkindji artist reflecting on past relationships over the Latin-influenced beat. Barkaa mixes playfully bossed-up bars with social commentary on the experiences of First Nations people, rapping, “Where the fuck is my crown now? Nah keep it / I just only want my land back.” The empowering and socially charged new track delivers the first taste of Barkaa’s forthcoming debut EP, Blak Matriarchy. Though she doesn’t want the crown, ‘King Brown’ is more certified cash from the queen.

KUZI & MALEEK HUNTER – LAVISH
(Directed by Kota Sato & AJRFILMS)

Rising artists Kuzi and Maleek Hunter boast their ‘Lavish’ lifestyle in this Sydney collab. After their break-out performances last year, the two emcees join forces for Kuzi’s lowkey drill heater, the BLF (Blood Last Forever) member’s first entry to 2021. Across the Reddax production of sprawling piano keys and Drill percussion, Kuzi casually delivers the song’s hook with an infectious edge. While Maleek Hunter appears for only a short verse in the Kota Sato and AJRFILMS directed music video, his meticulous flow presents an impressive lyrical potential. As ‘Lavish’ embeds the two newcomers deeper into Sydney’s drill and trap scene, our eyes stay stuck on what Kuzi and Maleek Hunter have in store for the rest of 2021.

REDDEYE GLIZZI – INDESTRUCTIBLE
(Directed by Lawson Cross)

Brisbane’s Reddeye Glizzi stands tall on his sophomore record, ‘Indestructible’. Following his break-out 2020 trap anthem ‘Pop Pop’, Glizzi opts for an introspective successor with his latest effort. Directed by Lawson Cross, the music video depicts a focused and hungry young artist reflecting on his adversity with resilience and determination. Over sombre piano keys and thumping trap drums, Glizzi offers a passionate and moody delivery of melodies and bars. While the QLD rapper’s debut was a noticeable moment in releases last year, ‘Indestructible’ proves his potential and reveals another impressive piece of the puzzle to Reddeye Glizzi.

JALMAR – MIJO RICO
(Directed by Tino Nyoni)

Melbourne-born Jalmar adds a twist of his Latin American heritage in debut track, ‘Mijo Rico’. Produced by Younique, the Chilean artist combines high energy Latin instrumentation with triumphant trumpets, and raging 808s and trap drums. ‘Mijo Rico’ is not only an explosive display of Jalmar’s energetic delivery and crafty wordplay, but also the undeniable entry of Latin influence on music across Australia. In the music video directed by Tino Nyoni, Jalmar’s charisma is captured through a late 19th century era styled dream. ‘Mijo Rico’ marks The Orchard signee’s debut track, and Jalmar commands all the attention.

DOUBLE O SMOOVE – CHLOE GRACE
(Shot & Edited by Double O Smoove)

Melbourne’s Double O Smoove reveals the raunchy visuals to his latest single, ‘Chloe Grace’. Shot and edited by himself, the music video shows Smoove living his best life – dropping bars with scenery of clear skies, beaches, and plenty of pretty women. After dropping two projects last year, Smoove looks to be placing a heavier emphasis on his single releases in 2021. Dominated by its hyperbolic 808s and explicit lyrics, the Philadelphia raised rapper’s latest joint is a vibe everywhere from the bar to the bedroom. It’s tracks like this that’ll have you missing sweaty and pre-pandemic clubbing.

PRAX – INSANE
(Directed by Nick Rae)

Alt-pop artist Prax and Melbourne videographer Nick Rae deliver an ‘Insane’ new music video. The 19-year old Brisbane singer merges haunting alt-pop vocals and distorted rock instrumentation across dark R&B production. With Brisbane handling sonics and Melbourne delivering the music video, Nick Rae visualises Prax’s moody and tormented lyrics through claustrophobic B&W shots and edits. It’s artists like Prax, influenced heavily by Lil Peep and the emo-rap scene, who can execute these passionate Weeknd-style croons in such an enrichingly unique experience. Following the success from his 2020 single run, keep an eye on this Brisbane creative as he continues to deepen his catalogue.

Article by Frank Tremain.

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